December

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Dear Valued Visitor,

Happy New Year! I'd like to thank everyone for making this a very succesful year for BarNone Drink Recipes. I wish you all the best in 2005!


Dan Hutchinson

BarNone Changes

I'd just like to pass on a little news about the new server and some other tidbits about the site. First, the new server is doing very well. We should have the new site programming done soon. I just have about 5,000 recipes to edit.

Second, I hope you've noticed the lack of Pop-Up and Pop-Under ads on the site lately. We added the Skyscraper and Rectangle to eliminate the pops that everyone hates. If we continue to do well with the non pop advertising, you shouldn't see any more on the site.

Hangover Cures

Let the New Year's parties begin! Now I know you'll all drink in moderation and won't get a hangover, but in case you have one or two too many drinks, here is a list of some cures.

  • Hair of the Dog
    The number one cure. Once the liver starts to process the methanol in your blood stream, you start to feel the effects of a hangover. Have another drink and you stop that processing. Of course this only delays the inevitable but it does get you back on your feet for a short time.

     

  • Advil
    Need pain relief? Take a couple of Advil. Sometimes this is best done before going to bed because you may not keep them down the next morning.

    Tylenol (Acetominophen) is a very bad thing to take. Combined with the alcohol in your blood stream can cause very serious liver damage. Read the label and play it safe.

  • Hardy Man Breakfast
    Eating a huge meal will increase your metabolism and help speed the process of cleaning your body of the alcohol. So, if you can stomach some food, go out and eat like a horse. Make sure to include a couple of eggs to increase the amino acids in your body. The aminos help produce an enzyme called glutathione which also helps to clean your system.

     

  • Water
    When your body can't get enough water from regular sources, it steals from other areas of your body. Drink a few glasses of water to prevent this and help the rest of your body stay healthy.

     

    Of course the best way to drink in moderation. I've never tried this so I'm not sure it works all that well. In any case, have a great night, stay safe and enjoy yourself!

Rose's, a tradition of excellence

Ever wonder how Rose's Lime Juice, Sweet & Sour, Triple Sec and Grenadine came about. You've seen the bottles in bars all over the world. Read below for a little history on the famous Rose's brand.

Key Facts

  • Rose's is the #1 brand of lime juice and grenadine.
  • 100% sweetened lime juice from West Indian limes, Rose's Lime Juice is a key ingredient in many traditional cocktails and rum drinks.
  • Grenadine is an essential ingredient in many trendy and lighter drinks to add color and taste appeal.
  • Sweet & Sour is used in more mixed drinks than any other non-alcoholic ingredient.
  • Triple Sec is used in more than 250 mixed drinks.

     

    History

    Rose's Lime Juice is a remarkable brand with an adventurous heritage and a robust history; sailing ships, warm West Indies isles, trenches of World War I, Africa's Gold Coast and the London Blitz are all part of the colorful legend of this unique product.

    Lauchlin Rose (1829-1885) a descendent of a prominent family of Scottish ship builders, founded L. Rose & Company in Leith, Edinburgh in 1865. Describing himself as a "lime and lemon juice merchant," he combined a keen business sense with his knowledge of the sea. Scurvy, caused by a deficiency of vitamin C, had been the scourge of sailors since the early days of sailing ships. To prevent "this most terrible of the diseases of maritime life," a supply of lime or lemon juice preserved with 15% of rum, generally was boarded for long voyages. In 1867, Lauchlin developed and patented a process that effectively prevented fermentation and preserved fruit juice without alcohol. The same year, the Merchant Shipping Act was passed, whereby all vessels, Royal Navy and Merchant, were required to carry lime juice for a daily ration to ships' company. It was this enactment that resulted in British sailors being called "limeys" and brought about a sales volume boost for this new L. Rose & Company business. From Cape Town in Singapore, from Bombay to Belize, Rose's literally sailed the seven seas.

    In 1875, the company's head office was moved from Scotland to England. From the first days of the brand, the classic Rose's bottle, with the embossed "lime leaves & fruit" design, has been part of the packaging. Many of the earlier versions are today considered collector items. In 1895, the company bought an abundant lime crop and considerable coca acreage at the Bath Estate on Dominica in the Caribbean. Some fresh limes from the island were annually shipped to North America, while bottled Rose's Lime Juice arrived in the United States from the United Kingdom.

    The early years of the new century were successful for the growing Rose's enterprise, and in 1919 Lauchlin Rose, grandson of the founder, entered the business. By 1924, he was General Manager and that year established a lime industry in the Gold Coast, now Ghana - a new venture that really had its start in the summer of 1916. Just prior to the Battle of the Somme, Lauchlin Rose was assigned to the Royal Engineers, serving under the Engineers' Commander, Sir Gordon Gugisberg. After the war, Sir Gordon became Governor of the Gold Coast. On a chance meeting with Lauchlin, their discussion led to the proposal of developing Ghana as an alternate supply source of limes.

    The Depression years of the early '30s were tough for the company as they were for all the world trade, but from 1935 until the outbreak of WWII, the business enjoyed steady expansion. As war threatened, there was growing concern that the company's facilities were in a probable target area. An alternate site was located and the move was completed to St. Albans, northwest of London. On September 7, 1940, three days after the onset of the Blitz, the company's London premises were bombed.

    Rose's joined Schweppes in 1957 and has since expanded its product line. Rose's Lime Juice remains the premier choice with over 99% of U.S. retail lime juice sales. Its distinctive bottle is recognized and appreciated as a symbol of quality around the globe.

New Year's Recipes

Click on the image to head off to a few special New Year's Drink Recipes. We've picked some classics as well as some others. Hope you enjoy!

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