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Layering Drinks


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#1 barbj

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 05:39 AM

I've been looking into the specific gravity of different drinks to determine the best way to mix them.  I usually pour the hard liquor in first as a rule and then pour the mixer (soda) in second.  Due to the sugar concentration in a non-diet sode my thinking is it will float to the bottom and the liquor will float towards the top causing a nice mixture.  This floating is caused by a lighter specific gravity in the liquor on the bottom.

The only problem is I'm not 100% sure if my theory is a good one.  Does anyone know where I can find the specific gravity of some sodas?  Also do you think my theory is incorrect or correct?

Thank You

#2 Dan

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 10:48 AM

barbj,

Good question about the soda values.  We do have a partial list here at Bar None, but it does not include any sodas.

Cheers,

Dan

#3 barbj

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 02:59 PM

i have always heard it's best (if you're not shaking or stirring) to put the hard liquor in first then the mixer.  my thinking is the hard liquor usually floats to the top while the mixer sinks towards the bottom.  this might cause an even mixture.  Has anyone else heard this?

Edited by barbj, 14 January 2007 - 03:12 PM.


#4 danny

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Posted 19 January 2007 - 04:12 PM

I think I read that the more sugar the heavier the liquid

#5 _Brian C_*

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Posted 07 July 2007 - 12:45 PM

Generally speaking, the more sugary drinks will settle to the bottom and the higher the alcohol content, the lighter specific gravity. Although this is a good general rule, it is not always the case. More "general" rules include:
lowest proof liqueur or highest sugar concentrate on bottom
each layer should be approximately 10 degrees of proof higher than the previous